1. K-State home
  2. »Communications
  3. »Communication Services
  4. »Publishing
  5. »Style Guide
  6. »Style, F-J

Communications and Agricultural Education

Communications and Agricultural Education

Kansas State University
1612 Claflin Road
301 Umberger Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506-3402

785-532-5804
785-532-5633 fax

Style, F-G-H-I-J


farmers market — A noun phrase that describes a place where local growers can sell their wares. Note the lack of apostrophe.

farther, furtherFarther is used to express physical distance. He hiked farther into the wilderness. Further applies to extent or degree. I will conduct further research into the problem.

Feed the Future Innovation Lab for the Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss — Second reference: the lab. The U.S. Agency for International Development provided $8.5 million over 5 years to reduce postharvest losses and food waste for grain and oil seeds; tuberous root crops; and peanut and legumes in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala. Jagger Harvey is the director of the lab and Jessa Barnard is the assistant director It’s headquartered in 105 Waters Hall on the K-State campus. https://www.k-state.edu/phl/. Feed the Future is the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative.

Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Sorghum and Millet, also known as the Sorghum and Millet Innovation Lab. — Second reference: the lab. The U.S. Agency for International Development provided $13.7 million over 5 years (renewable for an additional 5 years) to advance the science of sorghum and pearl millet in Ethiopia, Senegal, and Niger. K-State is the managing entity for the grant. Timothy Dalton, associate professor of agricultural economics is the project director. The project office is in 148 Waters Hall. www.ksu.edu/smil  Feed the Future is the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative.

Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Sustainable Intensification — Second reference: the lab. The lab is funded for up to $50 million through 2024 and includes funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development and other partners. The current focus countries are Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Senegal (past countries include Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Malawi and Tanzania).  Activities are focused on four core areas: to sustainably increase the production of nutritious food and encourage dietary diversity of smallholder and women farmers, to increase the involvement and empowerment of women in agricultural production and processing, to increase food production through improved crop-production technologies while minimizing environmental impact, and the prevention of food loss and waste and improving food safety. Vara Prasad, University Distinguished Professor, is the program director. https://www.k-state.edu/siil/index.html Feed the Future is the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative.

Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Applied Wheat Genomics — Second reference: the lab. The U.S. Agency for International Development provided $5 million over 5 years to develop wheat varieties that are resilient to the warming effects of climate change inIndia and Pakistan. Jesse Poland, associate professor of plant pathology, is the project director. The team includes Kansas State University, the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), and Cornell University. https://www.k-state.edu/wheat-innovation-lab/index.htmlFeed the Future is the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative.

fewer, less — Use fewer if you are counting items. There are fewer marbles in this jar than in the other one. Use less to indicate an amount. He has less than $100 in his account.

FFA — The organization formerly known as Future Farmers of America is now known by its initials only.

first come, first served — Not hyphenated; indicates that something will be dealt with in the order in which it was received. Tickets are available on a first come, first served basis.

firsthand — One word.

five grand challenges — Lowercase in text referring to the five grand challenges that are an emphasis for research and education by K-State Research and Extension. They are: global food systems, water, health, developing tomorrow’s leaders, and community vitality. The order can vary, but global food systems should be listed first. The publication UNN28, Making a Difference for KansansJanuary 2014, describes the five grand challenges in more detail.

flyer — Preferred now and included in AP, this word applies to both the person who flies and the handbill announcing an event or product. Use flier for the phrase take a flier, meaning to take a bit of a risk.

foodborne — One word.

french fries — Lowercase — it refers to the style of cut, not the country.

full time, full-time — Hyphenate when used as a modifier. She works full time. I’m looking for full-time work.

fundraising, fundraiser — One word.

government entities — Capitalize "City" and "State" when referring to the government. She works for the City of Manhattan. I'm a State of Kanss employee. When referring to the place, lowercase words such as "city," "village," "township," and "state." I live in the village of Industry. He visited his grandmother in the city. My uncle lives in the state of Nebraska. 

grand challenges — See five grand challenges.

groundwater — One word.

gpa — Gallons per acre

gpm — Gallons per minute

GPS — Global positioning system

handwashing — One word.

health care — No hyphen when used as a noun. She was concerned about the high cost of health care.
Hyphenate when used as an adjective. He was looking for a new health-care provider.

health insurance marketplace — A place to find affordable private insurance plans approved by the federal government. Lowercase unless part of a title.

impact — Avoid using impact as a verb, except to mean “strike forcefully.” Raindrops impacted the soil surface, causing runoff and erosion. Do not use impact to mean “affect."

Internet — Capitalize.

intranet — A private network within an organization; lowercase.

its, it’s — Spell the contraction of “it is” with an apostrophe (it’s). Leave out the apostrophe for the possessive of “it” (its).