Department of Communications and Agricultural Education

Kansas State University
301 Umberger Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506-4004

785-532-5804
785-532-5633 fax

2007 telephone survey for K-State Research and Extension (all Kansas data)

The service provided by K-State Research and Extension is perceived by Kansans to be important.

Kansans' opinions on the importance of K-State Research and Extension's services in Kansas

  • Very important: 74.4%
  • Somewhat important: 22.9%
  • Not important: 2.5%
  • No response: .2%

 

 This study was conducted for K-State Research and Extension in June/July 2007 by the Survey Research Center at the University of Kansas. All respondents are age 18 or older. 512 Kansas residents responded, and the margin of error is +/- 4 percent with a confidence level of 95 percent.

Internet and computer usage among Kansans is high, but awareness of the KSRE website is low.

How often do you use the Internet for any purpose?

  • Daily (283 responses): 55.3%
  • Weekly (68): 13.3%
  • 1-3 times/month (35): 6.8%
  • Never (121): 23.6%

 

Awareness of KSRE web site or the local county's website

  • Respondent knows the Web address (27): 5.3%
  • Respondent has been to the site (67): 13.1%

This study was conducted for K-State Research and Extension in June/July 2007 by the Survey Research Center at the University of Kansas. All respondents are age 18 or older. 512 Kansas residents responded, and the margin of error is +/- 4 percent with a confidence level of 95 percent.

 

A comparison of how current users and non-users of KSRE information rate the effectiveness of channels for receiving information.

KSRE Users vs. Non-Users: Rating the Effectiveness of Select Information Channels

Percentages reflect the number of respondents who rates the channel as effect or very effective ways to receive information.

Current Users (152 responses)

  • Brochures or reports: 87.9%
  • Articles in local newspapers: 86.9%
  • Newsletters: 86.9%
  • Information in public places: 86.2%
  • Stories on local TV stations: 83.5%
  • Local presentations or seminars: 78.3%
  • Direct access by telephone with specialists: 77.0%
  • Internet: 65.1%
  • Stories on local radio stations: 65.8%
  • Videotapes at county offices or other locations: 55.9%
  • College-level courses or classes: 53.9%

 

Non-Users (360 responses)

  • Stories on local TV stations: 88.9%
  • Articles in local newspapers: 86.0%
  • Information in public places: 76.6%
  • Brochures or reports: 74.3%
  • Newsletters: 72.6%
  • Internet: 71.1%
  • Stories on local radio stations: 70.1%
  • Local presentations or seminars: 65.5%
  • Direct access by telephone with specialists: 65.5%
  • College-level courses or classes: 55.0%
  • Videotapes at county offices or other locations: 32.7%

 

This study was conducted for K-State Research and Extension in June/July 2007 by the Survey Research Center at the University of Kansas. All respondents are age 18 or older. 512 Kansas residents responded, and the margin of error is +/- 4 percent with a confidence level of 95 percent.

 

 

Kansans indicated a minimal familiarity with such Web technologies as blogs, discussion boards and chat rooms.

Mean scores for respondents' familiarity with common or emerging Web technologies

Scale: 1 -- Completely unfamiliar; 3 -- Somewhat familiar; 5 -- Very familiar with the technology and have used it.

  • Podcasts: 1.60
  • YouTube: 1.99
  • News feeds, or RSS feeds: 2.63
  • Blog: 2.22
  • Discussion board: 2.28
  • Chat room: 2.34

(Note: Subsets of this data indicate that men have a slightly higher familiarity and use of these technologies than women)

 

 This study was conducted for K-State Research and Extension in June/July 2007 by the Survey Research Center at the University of Kansas. All respondents are age 18 or older. 512 Kansas residents responded, and the margin of error is +/- 4 percent with a confidence level of 95 percent.

 

Information from K-State Research and Extension is perceived by Kansans to be credible.

Credibility of information from K-State Research and Extension

  • Very credible: 74.0%
  • Somewhat credible: 15.0%
  • Not credible: 3.1%
  • No response: 7.8%

 

 
This study was conducted for K-State Research and Extension in June/July 2007 by the Survey Research Center at the University of Kansas. All respondents are age 18 or older. 512 Kansas residents responded, and the margin of error is +/- 4 percent with a confidence level of 95 percent.
Kansans' responses on information channels they use to get information on topics of interest.

Information Channels Used by Kansans

Percentages reflect the number of respondents who rates the channel as effect or very effective ways to receive information.

All responses (512 responses)

  • Stories on local TV stations: 85.7%
  • Articles in local newspapers: 81.8%
  • Information in public places: 79.6%
  • Newsletters: 78.5%
  • Brochures or reports: 70.3%
  • Internet: 69.4%
  • Stories on local radio stations: 68.0%
  • Direct access by telephone with specialists: 64.1%
  • Local presentations or seminars: 63.7%
  • College-level courses or classes: 52.5%
  • Videotapes at county offices or other locations: 47.7%

 

Young Adults, Ages 24-44 (122 responses)

  • Stories on local TV stations: 90.9%
  • Internet: 87.7%
  • Information in public places: 86.9%
  • Newsletters: 84.4%
  • Brochures or reports: 79.5%
  • Articles in local newspapers: 76.2%
  • Local presentations or seminars: 73.0%
  • Stories on local radio stations: 70.5%
  • Direct access by telephone with specialists: 69.7%
  • College-level courses or classes: 56.6%
  • Videotapes at county offices or other locations: 46.8%

 

This study was conducted for K-State Research and Extension in June/July 2007 by the Survey Research Center at the University of Kansas. All respondents are age 18 or older. 512 Kansas residents responded, and the margin of error is +/- 4 percent with a confidence level of 95 percent.

Kansas residents more commonly recognize the organization as 'Extension' than by its actual name.

Kansans' recognition of names associated with K-State Research and Extension

  • Extension: 70% have heard this name
  • K-State Research and Extension: 55.5% have heard this name
  • Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station or Cooperative Extension Service: 51.2% have heard this name.

This study was conducted for K-State Research and Extension in June/July 2007 by the Survey Research Center at the University of Kansas. All respondents are age 18 or older. 512 Kansas residents responded, and the margin of error is +/- 4 percent with a confidence level of 95 percent.

Kansans show strong support for many of the areas in which K-State Research and Extension provides information.

Kansans' Interest in Selected Topics

  • Environmental Preservation Issues: 92.6% were very or somewhat interested
  • Health and Nutrition Issues: 92.6% were very or somewhat interested
  • Youth Development Issues: 84.8% were very or somewhat interested
  • Home and Family Issues: 82.8% were very or somewhat interested
  • Lawn, Gardening or Landscaping Information: 81.2% were very or somewhat interested
  • Community Development Issues: 78.1% were very or somewhat interested
  • Farming, Ranching, Agribusiness or Small Acreage Management: 68.5% were very or somewhat interested

 

 This study was conducted for K-State Research and Extension in June/July 2007 by the Survey Research Center at the University of Kansas. All respondents are age 18 or older. 512 Kansas residents responded, and the margin of error is +/- 4 percent with a confidence level of 95 percent.

 

Extension Brand Value Research (National Study), February 2010

Few consumers of Extension information know about its connection to a national network.

Among Consumers Who Know About Their State Extension Service

  • Those who know about the connection between state and national Extension: 13%
  • Those who do not know the connection between state and national Extension: 87%

Impact of knowing the connection to the national network

  • Greatly improves the perception of state Extension: 19%
  • Somewhat improves the perception of state Extension: 40%
  • Makes no difference: 41%

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Extension offers areas that are relevant. Survey respondents agree that Extension programs are needed.

Level of support for Extension programs

Survey respondents were given a list of statements and asked to indicate their level of agreement on the following question: We really need programs that

  • teach people how to better manage finances: 84% said they strongly or somewhat agree
  • help youth develop leadership skills: 82% said they strongly or somewhat agree
  • teach parenting and family communication skills: 78% said they strongly or somewhat agree
  • educate the public on protecting the environment: 76% said they strongly or somewhat agree
  • teach people how to live healthier lives: 75% said they strongly or somewhat agree
  • teach small business owners the skills needed to succeed: 71% said they strongly or somewhat agree
  • can help our farmers succeed: 66% said they strongly or somewhat agree
  • educate homeowners about gardening/landscape: 36% said they strongly or somewhat agree

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

A major challenge for the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service is that very few people know about Extension and the service it provides.

Awareness/Knowledge of U.S. Land-Grant Universities

  • Have heard of the term, Land-Grant University: 14%
  • Know that there is a Land-Grant University in their state: 7%
  • Correctly named the Land-Grant University in their state: 6%

Awareness/Knowledge of Cooperative Extension

  • Have heard of Cooperative Extension: 27%
  • Have heard of their state's Extension program: 38%
  • Know that their state is part of a national network: 5%

Familiarity with Extension among those who have heard of Extension

Among all respondents, 38% have heard of their state's Extension program. Of this 38%:

  • 3% said they are "extremely familiar" with the program
  • 5% said they are "very familiar" with the program
  • 23% said they are "somewhat familiar" with the program
  • 39% said they are "slightly familiar" with the program
  • 30% said they are "not at all familiar" with the program

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Extension clients have very positive perceptions of the Extension program areas they have used.

Client perceptions of Extension program areas, by category

Family

  • Very good: 28%
  • Excellent: 64%

Personal Health

  • Very good: 33%
  • Excellent: 59%

Gardening and Landscape

  • Very good: 31%
  • Excellent: 61%

Environment

  • Very good: 35%
  • Excellent: 56%

Agriculture/Farming/Ranching

  • Very good: 33%
  • Excellent: 56%

Youth Development

  • Very good: 29%
  • Excellent: 58%

Personal Finance

  • Very good: 30%
  • Excellent: 57%

Community Improvement

  • Very good: 33%
  • Excellent: 53%

Small Business

  • Very good: 38%
  • Excellent: 43%

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Consumers would like the government and universities to do more to improve community life.

Consumer Agreement with Statement

  • Government organizations should do more to offer programs and services that improve community life: 65% agree with this statement
  • I wish my community could benefit more from the research and knowledge in our universities: 63% agree with this statement.

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Clients are familiar with the breadth of support that Extension can provide, but less than half turn to Extension as a first resource for information.

Client Agreement with the Following Statements

  • Extension offers a wide range of programs and services that can benefit my community: 87% agree
  • When I need information for something, the first place I turn to is Extension: 47% agree

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Younger people are the least likely to be familiar with Extension.

Younger people are much less likely to have heard of or used Extension.

Have heard of Cooperative Extension

  • Younger people, 18-35 years old: 16%
  • Total population: 27%

Have heard of their state's Extension program

  • Younger people, 18-35 years old: 28%
  • Total population: 38%

Have used Extension

  • Younger people, 18-35 years old: 5%
  • Total population: 11%

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

A greater focus on program areas relevant for young adults (ages 18-34) will help build long-term brand value for Extension.

More than two-thirds of younger people (ages 18-34) say they are likely to use Extension for information or programs in some area.

Likelihood to use Extension, by category

  • Personal Health: 68%
  • Personal Finance: 36%
  • Environment: 31%
  • Gardening and Landscaping: 23%
  • Family: 23%
  • Youth Development: 17%
  • Small Business: 15%
  • Community Improvement: 12%
  • Agriculture/Farming/Ranching: 3%

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Extension stakeholders have a very positive impression of their state's Extension service.

Perception of State Extension Service (Feb. 2010)

Clients

  • Very good: 36%
  • Excellent: 49%

Volunteers

  • Very good: 41%
  • Excellent: 44%

Employees

  • Very good: 50%
  • Excellent: 28%

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Those who have used Extension give it very strong ratings. The same cannot be said of other resources people have used.

Perceptions of Extension (among those using Extension)

  • Excellent: 36%
  • Very good: 46%

Perceptions of other resources (among those using other resources)

  • Excellent: 13%
  • Very good: 38%

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Those who do not currently know about Extension react positively when finding out about it.

Knowledge of Extension

  • People who know about Extension: 26%
  • People who do not know about Extension: 74%

When the 74% who do not know about Extension are given information on what it can provide:

  • 35% say they like it very much
  • 38% say they like it somewhat
  • 27% say they neither like or dislike

 Having found out about Extension, most people expect to use the information or programs it provides

(By category)

  • Personal Health: 72%
  • Gardening and Landscaping: 38%
  • Personal Finance: 32%
  • Environment: 28%
  • Family: 19%
  • Small Business: 15%
  • Community Improvement: 14%
  • Youth Development: 12%
  • Agriculture/Farming/Ranching: 5%

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

In a recent national study, Extension employees said that improved visibility and marketing is a major area that needs improvement.

Percentage of respondents who agreed with the following statements, by category:

1) Extension often does not get due credit for the information/education it provides.

  • Employees who strongly or somewhat agree: 90%
  • Volunteers who strongly or somewhat agree: 88%

2) Extension needs to do a much better job at communicating the value it provides the community.

  • Employees who strongly or somewhat agree: 85%
  • Volunteers who strongly or somewhat agree: 74%

3) Extension as an organization is slow to change.

  • Employees who strongly or somewhat agree: 57%
  • Volunteers who strongly or somewhat agree: 34%

There were 1,911 employees and 1,300 volunteers who responded in this survey.

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Extension stakeholders report the Internet has changed the world we live in.

Stakeholder and Consumer Agreement with the Following Statements

The Internet is a tool that has changed the world we live in

  • Clients (1,260 responses): 95%
  • Employees (1,911 responses): 97%
  • Volunteers (1,300 responses): 96%
  • General market perspective: 97%

The Internet is the first place I turn to when I need some information

  • Clients (1,260 responses): 73%
  • Employees (1,911 responses): 74%
  • Volunteers (1,300 responses): 68%
  • General market perspective: 83%

There's so much information on the Internet, it's difficult to know what to trust

  • Clients (1,260 responses): 74%
  • Employees (1,911 responses): 79%
  • Volunteers (1,300 responses): 74%
  • General market perspective: 70%

There's so much information on the Internet, it's difficult to know what is relevant and up-to-date

  • Clients (1,260 responses): 71%
  • Employees (1,911 responses): 78%
  • Volunteers (1,300 responses): 72%
  • General market perspective: 65%

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Building Extension brand value is particularly important because people have alternative sources for finding information.

Sources of information, past 12 months, by category

Agriculture/Farming/Ranching

  • Percentage who used Extension as a source: 45%
  • Percentage who use other sources of information: 40%

Gardening and Landscaping

  • Percentage who used Extension as a source: 41%
  • Percentage who use other sources of information: 41%

Youth Development

  • Percentage who used Extension as a source: 31%
  • Percentage who use other sources of information: 25%

Environment

  • Percentage who used Extension as a source: 28%
  • Percentage who use other sources of information: 38%

Personal Health

  • Percentage who used Extension as a source: 25%
  • Percentage who use other sources of information: 42%

Community Improvement

  • Percentage who used Extension as a source: 19%
  • Percentage who use other sources of information: 26%

Family

  • Percentage who used Extension as a source: 11%
  • Percentage who use other sources of information: 22%

Personal Finance

  • Percentage who used Extension as a source: 7%
  • Percentage who use other sources of information: 32%

Small Business

  • Percentage who used Extension as a source: 5%
  • Percentage who use other sources of information: 12%

 

Those who use Extension also seek alternative sources

Most clients do no rely soley on Extension for help in any program area.

Percentage of respondents who say they use other sources of information, in addition to Extension, by category.

  • Environment: 82%
  • Agriculture/Farming/Ranching: 78%
  • Community Improvement: 76%
  • Family: 75%
  • Personal Health: 75%
  • Small Business: 73%
  • Gardening and Landscaping: 73%
  • Personal Finance: 66%
  • Youth Development: 60%

 

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Many communications channels should be used to reach current and potential Extension audiences.

Methods of Accessing Extension, All Stakeholders

(Percentages indicate the number of respondents who said they are somewhat or very likely to use the listed communication channel for Extension information.)

  • Search the Internet: 98%
  • Ask for brochures/publications: 91%
  • How-to TV show: 83%
  • Take online course: 79%
  • Attend a meeting/workshop: 76%
  • Download a How-to video from the Internet: 76%
  • Call 800/local number: 72%
  • Chat online with an expert: 64%
  • Attend a class that meets several times: 62%
  • Listen to a How-to radio program: 55%
  • Social networking site like MySpace or Facebook: 47%
  • Download a podcast: 44%

Methods of Accessing Extension, Clients (current users of Extension)

  • Attend a meeting/workshop: 97%
  • Search the Internet: 95%
  • Ask for brochures/publications: 95%
  • Call 800/local number: 86%
  • Attend a class that meets several times: 84%
  • How-to TV show: 76%
  • Take online course: 76%
  • Download a How-to video from the Internet: 70%
  • Chat online with an expert: 57%
  • Listen to a How-to radio program: 56%
  • Download a podcast: 42%
  • Social networking site like MySpace or Facebook: 28%

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

Being trustworthy is the No. 1 factor that motivates people to seek information from a particular source.

Motivating Power of Select Characteristics

('Motivating Power' is a score assigned to each characteristic based on a weighted average of such factors as consumer desirability, current perceptions, and the impact of individual perceptions on the overall preference for Extension.)

Scale

  • 0 = Not motivating
  • 100 = Extremely motivating

Characteristics that motivate consumers to seek information (general market research, more than 2,000 interviews)

  • Trustworthy source: 83
  • Great staff: 76
  • Convenient access: 75
  • Current/reliable information: 73
  • Expert review: 72
  • Quality of life: 70
  • Change agents: 66
  • Scope of work: 66
  • In-person support: 62
  • University connection: 45
  • Experience: 22

Characteristics that motivate Extension stakeholders to seek information (stakeholders include employees, volunteers and clients -- more than 4,700 in this study)

  • Trustworthy source: 84
  • Great staff: 83
  • Current/reliable information: 77
  • Convenient access: 71
  • In-person support: 68
  • Quality of life: 67
  • Expert review: 64
  • Change agents: 62
  • Scope of work: 61
  • University connection: 50
  • Experience: 23

In this study, characteristics were determined to be highly motivating (a score of 70+), moderately motivating (40-69), or less motivating (<40).

 

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

In a national study, respondents expressed a higher awareness of 4-H compared to Extension. The same study indicated awareness of Master Gardener is lower than Extension. Very few people know that either program is part of the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service.

Respondents' awareness of:

  • Extension: 38%
  • 4-H: 72%
  • Master Gardener: 17%

Knowledge that 4-H and Master Gardener is part of Extension:

  • 4-H: 9% know that it is part of Extension
  • Master Gardener: 6% know it is part of Extension

Source: Copernicus Marketing Consulting and Research, a national study conducted June/July 2008 to support a national branding initiative for the Cooperative Extension Service. The full study is available at http://drop.io/extbrandvalue/asset/extbrandvalue-webconf-pdf

1987 Research for the Kansas Cooperative Extension Service (Jim Lindquist, Ph.D.)

In 1987, Kansans strongly supported using public funds for Extension programs.

Should public funds be used to support Extension programs?

Scale:

1 -- Funding should be greatly decreased

2 -- Funding should be decreased

3 -- Funding should remain the same

4 -- Funding should be increased

5 -- Funding should be greatly increased

(Standard deviation for each mean is shown in parenthesis)

  • Kansas Cooperative Extension Service -- 3.49 (.76)
  • Agriculture -- 3.83 (.85)
  • Energy -- 3.54 (.92)
  • Horticulture -- 3.31 (.78)
  • 4-H -- 3.81 (.84)
  • Home Economics -- 3.42 (.80)
  • Community Development -- 3.63 (.87)
In 1987, Kansans rated newspapers and bulletins/newsletters as the top sources of information from Extension.
Sources of Information from the Kansas Cooperative Extension Service (576 Kansans responded)
 
 
* The number shown indicates the total number of Kansans citing this as a reliable source of information for Extension information. The percentage reflects the total number compared to all respondents.
 
 
  • Newspaper articles -- 225 (60%)
  • Radio or TV -- 185 (49%)
  • Bulletins or newsletters -- 223 (57%)
  • Meetings or workshops -- 81 (20%)
 
This data is part of a 1987 doctoral dissertation by James R. Lindquist. His study was titled, The Kansas Cooperative Extension Service: An Analysis of External Factors Impacting Organizational Decision-Making
 
In 1987, Kansans reported a high level of satisfaction with Extension programs.

Levels of Satisfaction with Kansas Extension programs

Scale: 1 – Very dissatisfied; 2 – Dissatisfied; 3 – Satisfied; 4 – Very satisfied
(Standard deviation for mean is shown in parenthesis)
 

 

Kansas Cooperative Extension Service
  • Mean: 3.10 (.44)
  • Mode: 3
 
Kansas 4-H
  • Mean: 3.16 (.56)
  • Mode: 3
 
Energy
  • Mean: 2.91 (.49)
  • Mode: 3
 
Home Economics
  • Mean: 3.12 (.46)
  • Mode: 3
 
Horticulture
  • Mean: 3.11 (.47)
  • Mode: 3
 
Agriculture
  • Mean: 2.94 (.59)
  • Mode: 3
 
Community Development
  • Mean: 2.91 (.52)
  • Mode: 3

 

This data is part of a 1987 doctoral dissertation by James R. Lindquist. His study was titled, The Kansas Cooperative Extension Service: An Analysis of External Factors Impacting Organizational Decision-Making
 
In 1987, less than 50% of Kansans said they have used Extension's services.

 

How often do you use the Kansas Cooperative Extension Service? (576 responses)
 
  • Never – 57% (non-users)
  • Once or twice – 27%
  • Every couple of months – 11%
  • Every week or two – 5%

(NOTE: In K-State Research and Extension's 2007 telephone survey, the percentage of Kansans using the organization's services had increased to approximately 73%)

 

This data is part of a 1987 doctoral dissertation by James R. Lindquist. His study was titled, The Kansas Cooperative Extension Service: An Analysis of External Factors Impacting Organizational Decision-Making
Only 51 percent of respondents associated an individual program with the Kansas Cooperative Extension Service.
Awareness of CES programs (576 Kansans responded)
 
Standard deviation is shown in parentheses
 
Scale: 1 – not familiar; 2 – Slightly familiar; 3 – Familiar; 4 – Very familiar
  • Cooperative Extension Service, general -- 1.77 (.94)
  • Agriculture -- 1.72 (.89)
  • Horticulture -- 1.71 (.91)
  • Home economics -- 1.96 (.97)
  • Commy development -- 1.69 (.85)
  • PRIDE -- 1.54 (.80)
  • 4-H Youth -- 2.37 (1.00)
  • Energy -- 1.57 (.77)
 
This data is part of a 1987 doctoral dissertation by James R. Lindquist. His study was titled, The Kansas Cooperative Extension Service: An Analysis of External Factors Impacting Organizational Decision-Making
 
Kansans were asked about the type of information they needed from the Kansas Cooperative Extension Service. The top 10 areas are shown below.
"This data is part of a 1987 doctoral dissertation by James R. Lindquist. His study was titled, The Kansas Cooperative Extension Service: An Analysis of External Factors Impacting Organizational Decision-Making"

KSRE County-Level Demographics

K-State Research and Extension's Segwick County office tracks demographics for participants in its Health and Nutrition programs.

Segwick County Health and Nutrition Demographic Information

Gender

  • Male - 8,606
  • Female - 9,456

Ethnicity

  • White - 6,962
  • Black - 3,099
  • Hispanic - 7,000
  • Asian - 955
  • Native American - 46

Age

  • Older than 65 - 1,050
  • Youth - 15,348

Other

  • Low Income - 15,348

Source: Lisa Friesen, R.D., Family and Consumer Sciences Agent for Foods and Nutrition for Segwich County

 

K-State Research and Extension's Sedgwick County office tracks demographics for participants in the Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS).

Segwick County Family and Consumer Science Information

Gender

  • Males - 3,427
  • Females - 10,053

Ethnicity

  • White - 10, 247
  • Black - 1,251
  • Hispanic -1,253
  • Asian - 288
  • Native Pacific - 207
  • American Indian - 232

Other

  • Low income - 3,859
  • Elderly - 1,664
  • Youth - 3,627
  • Disabled - 340

SHICK Program Demographics

Gender

  • Male - 3,445
  • Female - 4,050

Ethnicity

  • White - 6,161
  • Black - 695
  • Hispanic - 419
  • Asian - 168
  • Native Pacific - 16
  • American Indian - 44

Other

  • Low Income - 2,444
  • Elderly - 6,550
  • Disabled - 1,813

Healthy Aging Demographics

Gender

  • Male - 1,072
  • Female - 1,600

Ethnicity

  • White - 2,017
  • Black - 236
  • Hispanic - 317
  • Asian - 80
  • Native Pacific - 4
  • American Indian - 24

Other

  • None

Family and Community Education (FCE) Demographics

Gender

  • Male - 0
  • Female - 315

Ethnicity

  • White - 299
  • Black - 5
  • Hispanic - 3
  • Asian - 5
  • Native Pacific - 3
  • American Indian - 0

Other

  • None

Source: Denise Dias, Segwick County Extension Agent, FCS

 

 

 

K-State Research and Extension's Sedgwick County office has collected demographic information for participants in its 4-H programs.

Residence (2009-2010)

Youth

  • Rural (10,000-under): 235
  • Town and cities (10,000-50,000): 24
  • Suburbs of cities over 50,000: 21
  • Cities over 50,000: 140

Volunteers

  • Rural: 39
  • Town and cities (10,000-50,000): Not available
  • Suburbs of cities over 50,000: Not available
  • Cities over 50,000: 94

School Enrichment Program/Special interest (Data is from 2008-2009)

 

  • Rural: 2,248
  • Town and cities (10,000-50,000): 93
  • Suburbs of cities over 50,000: 886
  • Cities over 50,000: 14,571

Gender (2009-2010)

Youth

  • Male: 223
  • Female: 300

Volunteers

  • Male: 42
  • Female: 113

School Enrichment/Special Interest (2008-2009)

  • Male: 9081
  • Female: 8725

Ethnicity (Youth)

White (2009-2010)

  • Hispanic: 16
  • Non-Hispanic: 489

Black/African American (2008-2009)

  • Hispanic: 2
  • Non-Hispanic: 5

American Indian/Alaska Native (2008-2009)

  • Hispanic: 2
  • Non-Hispanic: 4

Asian

  • Hispanic: 0
  • Non-Hispanic: 3

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (2009-2010)

  • Hispanic: Not available
  • Non-Hispanic: Not available

Mixed (2009-2010)

  • Hispanic: 4
  • Non-Hispanic: 12

Ethnicity (School Enrichman/Special Interest Programs)

White (2009-2010)

  • Hispanic: 3,641
  • Non-Hispanic: 9,355

Black/African American (2009-2010)

  • Hispanic: 965
  • Non-Hispanic: 2,698

American Indian/Alaska Native (2009-2010)

  • Hispanic: 43
  • Non-Hispanic: 149

Asian (2009-2010)

  • Hispanic: 57
  • Non-Hispanic: 294

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (2009-2010)

  • Hispanic: 24
  • Non-Hispanic: 70

Mixed, White and Black (2009-2010)

  • Hispanic: 155
  • Non-Hispanic: 355
K-State Research and Extension's Sedgwick County office tracks demographics for participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

Sedgwick County EFNEP, participation

Ethnicity

White

  • Male: 30%
  • Female: 43%

African

  • Male: 1%
  • Female: 10%

Laotian

  • Male: 0%
  • Female: 1%

Mexican

  • Male: 3%
  • Female: 7%

Vietnamese

  • Male: 6%
  • Female: 6%

Age

  • 14-20: 13%
  • 21-29: 43%
  • 30-39: 17%
  • 40-49: 18%
  • 50-59: 5%

Source: Jan McMahon, K-State Research and Extension, Sedgwick County

K-State Research and Extension's Office of Local Government compiles social, economic, and demographic data and trends for every Kansas county.

Click here to view links for every county in Kansas. This report is updated with data available through 2008.

K-State Research and Extension's Fort Riley office keeps demographic information on participants in its programs.

K-State Research and Extension, Fort Riley

Reporting Period: October 2009 - August 2010

Participants

  • 1st quarter (Oct-Dec, 2009): 1,680
  • 2nd quarter (Jan-Mar, 2010): 629

Total (Oct 2009 - Mar 2010): 2,309

Gender

  • Male: 1420
  • Female: 888

Age

  • 0-3: 40
  • 4-12: 531
  • 13-18: 195
  • 18-25: 572
  • 26-34: 507
  • 35-55: 289
  • >55: 3

Ethnicity

  • White: 978
  • African American: 681
  • Hispanic White: 248
  • Hispanic Black: 86
  • Asian: 57
  • Pacific Islander: 44
  • American Indian/Alaskan: 0
  • Mixed Ethnicity (2 or more): 210

Communication Preferences

This research summary was created in June 2009 by K-State agricultural economists Vincent Amanor-Boadu, Carly Whorton and Traci Rothlisberger. It outlines Purposeful Use of Technology among Kansas Youth, including types of technology used and their accessibility.

 

NOTE: This was a convenience sample of 266 Kansas youth in grades 5 through 12 (approx. ages 10-19).
 
Access to the Internt
  • Dial-up: 12.6%
  • DSL: 28.7%
  • Cable: 18.9%
  • Satellite: 11.4%
  • Cell phones: 20.9%
  • Wi-Fi: 19.3%
Time spent on Information and Communication Technologies per day
  • Less than 1 hour: 14%
  • 1-2 hours: 16%
  • 2-4 hours: 22%
  • 5-10: 25%
  • 11-20: 13%
  • More than 20: 8%
How are Kansas youth using the Internet?
  • Playing games: 88.4%
  • Class projects: 78.8%
  • Homework: 77.3%
  • Music: 70.8%
  • Email: 6828%
  • Chat or IM: 53.4%
  • Social networking: 50.0%
  • Photos: 43.6%
  • TV: 38.6%
  • Creative uses: 34.5%
  • Read the news: 34.1%
  • Buy and sell: 31.8%
 
 
In January 2010, the Pew Research Center released a study that estimates American adults' use of the internet, and how they connect. There is a slight drop in the number of people using broadband connections, perhaps caused by the increased number of those connecting through WiFi or WiMax.

In a national survey between Nov. 30 and Dec. 27, 2009, the Pew Research Center found:

  • 74% of American adults (age 18 and older) use the Internet -- a slight drop from the April 2009 survey (which did not include Spanish interviews). In April, 2009, the number was 79%.
  • 60% of American adults use broadband connections at home -- a drop that is witin the margin of error from 63% in April 2009.
  • 55% of American adults connect to the internet wirelessly, either through WiFi or WiMax connection via their laptops or through a handheld device like a smart phone. This figure did not change significantly from April, 2009.

Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project. 2,258 adults were interviewed and the overall sample has a marge of error of +/- 2 percentage points. The full study is online at http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Internet-broadband-and-cell-phone-statistics.aspx

 

The Kansas Farm Bureau recently found that its' members prefer a state- or county-level publication for regular updates. Eighty-three percent of KFB members prefer to contact their local office by telephone.

Use of communication methods (newsletters, magazines, e-news, legislative bulletins) is consistent across age groups with the exception of websites. Younger members (18-39) are more than twice as likely to use this method as compared to older members (54+).

Sixty-eight percent thought communication fro the state level was best to inform. Forty-two percent indicated a printed newsletter,36% indicated a printed magazine and 18% indicated website.

Fifty-four percent preferred communication from the county level. Of those, 49% indicated newsletter and 15% preferred website.

Communication best to inform, by age, preference for print media among older members (55+); electronic media by younger (18-39).

In general, regularly scheduled communication is preferred (60%) over communication sent only when there is something new to report (40%), and post mail is preferred to e-mail (significantly highter interst in e-mail/electronic among younger members).

Overall 83% contact their county office by telephone.

Depth Interviews with Decision-Makers and Legislative Staff

Legislative staffers express concern about the value of organizational websites for gathering information.
How often do you use Web sites to gather information?
 
  • There’s some organizations that do a better job keeping up to date information on their sites. That’s kind of an important thing. If I want to find out what Farm Bureau thinks about an issue, if I can go to their website and find a press release, that’s great. But if it’s not current, something that’s posted two years ago on a topic, that’s not useful. I think relevance and how current it is is a big part.
 
  • Websites are fast becoming too jumbled to get information quickly.

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

Legislative staffers are using social media to connect to constituents and gather information.
How much value is social media or social networking sites in your job and/or for your boss?
 
  • The younger crowd uses those. My boss wouldn't know where to start. Senator Roberts would be the first to admit...he just got a new IPhone.
 
  • We will sometimes repost or retweet an item if it reflects well on KS/KS organizations. Using social media as an additional outlet along with P.Rs. is a good idea to pick up a feed initially.
 
  • There’s two different aspects here, I think. We use it a lot for distributing information, probably more than collecting information. We post press releases and other things that come out of our office on Twitter and Facebook. Personally, I use it as far as following CNN and things like that. It’s really a fast way to get news bites and stuff that’s going on. But as far as going there to look for specific reports on things, I would say no.

 

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

Legislative staffers say that they regularly filter and track comments from constituents.
What value are comments from constituents to you when determining what is newsworthy? Do you filter and track comments from constituents?
 
  • We definitely filter. Usually for us, if people are just writing in to express a comment on something that the Senator has already stated an opinion on, then… We respond to all constituent comments. A lot of times, he just wants a summary of what people are writing in about. We get thousands…a day, even, between email and letters and faxes. It would be just impossible for him to see everything.
  • We don't really have constituents any more (sad) but we ALWAYS filter.
  • We respond to all constituent comments. On the big issues, yes (we track comments). Health Care we had 10,000+ against and a few hundred pro reform. Climate change is the same way. And based off where the caller or comment card comes from we often know what their position will be prior to even reading. We get very specific requests or comments and we respond back.
  • We respond to everything but then I do compile a list of frequent comments for [Representative's Name Omitted] on a weekly basis, or a tally depending on the amount.

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

 

Staffers were asked about the best ways for them to receive time-sensitive information from K-State or other sources.
What is the best way to provide time-sensitive information?
 
  • Staff. We are the filter most of the time. Snail mail takes 6 plus weeks to show up in the Senator's office.
  • I would agree [that mail is not a good option]. It’s good to have something in writing to go back on, but we just get so much email, so much volume, that if we don’t get a phone call from someone saying we’re going to send you something, it’s easy to miss.
  • Phone conversation with participating groups. Phone and email records are great. Yes I agree with Clint on the phone call first. In my position, I don't deal as much with hot topics approaching the floor but instead see how the issues are carried out at the state. When new issues are implemented, I seek out answers as to what is occuring. I don't typically use social media as a source of incoming news. For me that is used in reposting the information and spreading it to others but I do not use it as a source. Websites are very valuable if they are up to date with information or press releases. Often times, websites are not as current as a major news source.
  • For the White House and former Presidents, mail is never a good option, email/fax are best when followed up with a phone call. For us, it all depends on who sends it, unfortunately. So if you can have a connection with an office, the more likely the request will be pushed forward. We use websites to vet everything, so the more legitimate the information (with sources) the better. Also, the easier to use, the better.

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

 

The Congressional recess is the best time of year to send annual reports to federal lawmakers.
K-State Research and Extension sends an annual Report to the Kansas Legislature, which is an overview and backgrounder on areas we think we need to highlight. Is there a good time of year to send these to you?
 
  • Congressional recess. August.
  • Congressional recess is the best.
  • [Response from President Aide] We are definitely full speed ahead in spring and fall, which is actually the best time to get in a request here. Summer and holidays, things shut down a little more. I'm always happy to answer any specific questions. We've found that if you call first and ask what we need, it's in better form to send to us.

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

 

Legislative staffers provided comments on how much information they use comes to them versus how much they seek out.

 

As a staffer, do you prefer to receive information from a source, or do you prefer to go find it when you need it.
 
  • It goes both ways, I think. Sometimes we seek things out, but a lot of times we get things sent our way, too.
  •  Both but more specific information is sought after. We often have to follow up with the author or the source. In our office we have the daily press clippings that show what is happening in all corners of the state and nationally. Direct email if it is very specific.

 

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

Legislative staffers comment on their use of the K-State Research and Extension website.
Have you seen the KSRE Web site recently? If so, what do you think about this as a source of information?
 
  • An upgrade in the search function would help.
  • I have always thought it is challenging to navigate.
  • (One other staffer said they had not looked at our site recently.)

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

 

Long and short formats can be appropriate for legislative staffers, depending on the topic and its urgency.

 

Is it better to provide a news brief with a link to more information, a full press release, a bulleted list, or some other format when providing information to you?
 
  • I really prefer emails with bullet points and necessary links if there is further information available. The impacts something might have on Kansans, good bad or indifferent is a lot of what it boils down to for our office. And then of course $$.
 
  • Politicians are often scared of getting spoofed. Or have a journalist do a hatchet job and not explain the full story. Depends on what the story is. If Congress is rewriting federal crop insurance that gets into the weeds pretty deep, bullet points are good. But if it is a outbreak of FMD then we need to know the story...how, where, what to do next.
 
  • I agree with [initials omitted]…don't leave any of the very important details out because often what you send will go directly to the boss. But if we need more information, yes definitely always include a [point of contact].
 
  • It probably depends on the preference of your boss, mine likes bullet points. If I get bullet points, that’s easier for me to pass on to him, if that’s what it is. If there’s more information available, then we can get it for him.
 
  • I think a lot of times it goes back to, if you get a phone call for instance, you’ve got an issue, or someone is making us aware of an issue that’s going on. A lot of times, that’s what makes something happen.
     
Messaging when sending reports, requests, etc…
 
  • A lot of times it goes back to how this is going to affect Kansas, put it on a personal level. Everything right now is how much is it going to cost. That’s always important.

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

 

In April 2010, staffers were asked about the type of information legislators need to help them make decisions.

 What type of information do politicians need to have/know to make a decision?

 
  • Those involved in public service need up-to-date, accurate information. We need to know both sides of the story. University information is important but it can also be manipulated. Prime example is with the climate change reports from 10-15 different Land Grant Universities. K-State even has two conflicting "reports" on climate change impacts. Often times one is discreated (sic) based off of who requested the report.
     
  • I would agree and say that reliable sources is very key as well. I guess information that is coming directly from a source or agency. I agree with what RF is stating.
     
  • I’d say it kind of depends on what it is but one thing my boss always wants to know is how it’s going to affect Kansas, how the people that a certain issue is going to affect, whether it’s agriculture or business…how this decision will affect real Kansans.
     
  •  … for someone like President Bush, he's only going to get involved if it's more of a national or state effort.


FORMAT:
One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

 

 

Legislative staffers share their thoughts on what qualifies as a credible source of information.
How do you determine what is a ‘credible’ source or ‘credible’ information?
 
  • [We] tend to feel more comfortable with national organizations rather than regional. I think K-State is definitely considered as a great source and credible "organization" but … the more you can come together and promote something, rather than one report coming from one college and another request coming from another office, the better it is for people like us anyway.
 
  • Organizations that we’ve developed a relationship with, that we know we can trust, are definitely more credible than something we’ve never heard of before. Ryan mentioned something earlier, as far as the university goes, it can vary on who’s doing the study, where the grant came from…there’s all these biases that can creep in when you’re looking at individuals like that. Universities, generally, I think Kansas State is pretty well trusted, but individual reports or things can be different depending on the circumstances.
 
  • Something that is more concrete than word of mouth. Items in writing from trusted sources. Organizations and individuals who have proven themselves over time. I feel like publications coming out of universities can be very credible. It is also important to know a little background on the funding behind a study as well.
 
  • First-hand accounts, a reporter who has a long history on the topic, long standing relationship. Each university has their own specialty. I would trust K-State on wheat research or crop insurance but not so much on organic or vegetable crops. Needs to be brief but also have enough information to have a clear understanding of the issue.

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.

 

Legislative staffers say they prefer in-person contact during Congressional recess.

 

What is the best way to reach you when you are on recess?
 
  • Person-to-person if we are back on campus. K-State has the annual staffer day in August that we gain a lot of good information. Very useful. Especially with the NBAF inviting out of state staffers who happen to be involved in the process. Risk-benefit is extremely important. The environmental movement is almost a religion today. Some people want to shut down all business because he harms the environment.
  • The only issue I would say, sometimes, if you are sending something to us by mail, [Staffers Name Omitted] and I travel a lot during recess, if we come back and there’s a big pile of two weeks’ mail on our desk, then something could get missed. That might not be the best.
     
  • I think (Legislative Staff Tours) are real good things. The staffer day in August usually…you spend one day on campus and one day somewhere else where K-State is doing something. Those are really good to see what is going on. Even random days when one of us happens to be in Manhattan. I’ve gone to the Wheat Genome lab, I’ve seen things that we’ve gotten federal appropriations for. I think those are good things, to see things that are not just on paper.

     

FORMAT: One-hour interview conducted on Tuesday, April 27 via Adobe CONNECT with legislative aides. All of those interviewed are K-State graduates.